Digital connects but behaviours stay the same

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Now I personally believe and I am working under the assumption that  – Building a digital framework and infrastructure will enable better democratic engagement and will also contribute to developing social capital and social cohesion.

I also accept that everyday when I go outside I can see that the majority of people don’t really help each other and most people are selfish and ignore neighbours etc and that is fine for now.

One of the many challenges we need to focus on when creating the digital climate is we must acknowledge that a digital climate is different to a transformation programme. It is a shift in thinking in which people and institutions are routinely aware of and constantly incorporate digital technology and opportunity into whatever they do.

I personally believe that within the next 3-4 years we will start to see a greater sense of individual and collective responsibility emerging and that in turn will manifest itself in communities and interesting things will happen.

Those “interesting things” might benefit from some nudging and this is where I believe the principles outlined in the framework can provide some focus – I’ve copied them in below for reference:

People and communities are unique

  • Design “with” not “for” people and communities
  • Design for Inclusion and accessibility
  • Enable independence
  • Foster health and wellbeing

Positive relationships and networks

  • Respect diversity of opinions
  • Connect people and connect networks
  • Co-operate and collaborate
  • Open by default

Enabling communities and environments

  • Evidence based research and decision-making
  • Support everyone to achieve
  • Think Local and Global
  • Digital infrastructure for smart communities/cities

Learning and development

  • Learn, discover and explore though experience
  • Create space for reflective practice
  • Foster creative and divergent thinking
  • Enable sustained learning

So we need to think about how we focus on nudging the behaviours of individuals, organisations, communities etc and help them shift their thinking by helping them connect to a greater purpose and allow the behaviour change to foster any transformation. This is where the work done on the capabilities within the digital framework starts to play out as they all contribute to the wider shift in thinking and in particular the participation capability as outlined in this post “The capabilities for digital local public services participation” start to form a key part of the shift – This comes back to the Super Empowered Hopeful Individuals mentioned in my post “World of Govcraft” and I’d also add in super empowered communities as well.

Urgent Optimism – extreme self motivation – a desire to act immediately to tackle an obstacle combined with the belief that we have a reasonable hope of success.
Social Fabric – We like people better when we play games with people – it requires trust that people will play by the same rules, value the same goal – this enables us to create stronger social relationships as a result
Blissful productivity – an average World of Warcraft gamer plays 22 hours a week: We are optimised as humans to work hard and if we could channel that productivity into solving real world problems what could we achieve?
Epic meaning – attached to an awe-inspiring mission.

All this creates Super Empowered Hopeful Individuals – People who are individually capable of changing the world – but currently only online /virtual worlds….

What we can’t and mustn’t do is focus on the transformation itself as we will only end up creating things that people don’t need and won’t want and services which are not holistic and are designed around current mindsets and thinking.  I’ve said it before that we need a complete paradigm shift  in this post “5 paradigm shifts for #localgov” and include the whole thing below…

1. Culture
Number 1 on any list in my humble opinion – the culture of local government generally is one that often assumes that external changes and challenges will often pass by and that a slower pace of change is sometimes considered as the most appropriate way forward. But that is no longer a valid assumption

The Old Paradigm: “Head down and it will all go away.”

The New Paradigm: “Embrace the new direction and provide leadership.”

2. Mindset

You often get people who simply turn up and literally sit in meetings and contribute nothing…I’ve always been a fan of the rule of two feet, if it isn’t working for you leave.

Old Paradigm: “Just put your body in the room.”

New Paradigm: “Show up with a creative, open mindset.”

3. Group Wisdom

Obvious perhaps, but just because someone has been promoted to the top of the organisations, it doesn’t and shouldn’t mean they know more than anyone else…In my personal opinion most senior people are actually more politically aware than intellectually aware.

Old Paradigm: “All wisdom exists at the top.”

New Paradigm: “Listen and make space for various voices.”

4. Environment

I’ve only really recently appreciated this one, most people are forced into cultures that require them to sit in rows, in quiet offices, without any real social interaction even when the rooms are open plan. I understand that the sector is rationalising property assets and encouraging hot-desking and the like but we really should think about what we are trying to do…

Old Paradigm: “Do what is normal.”

New Paradigm: “Approach space creatively to serve the purpose.”

5. Vision

For me this could have also been called purpose…why do we do the things we do…A recent session at Open Space South West creatively called “reducing isolation and helping those who give a shit”

Old Paradigm: “Work to get paid.”

New Paradigm: “Make your work about something bigger.”

One of the key things for me is ensuring that we avoid replicating and amplifying existing behaviours in a digital infrastructure as this will only ensure we do the wrong thing righter and not the right thing from the start.

The “right” environment

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For some this may appear a somewhat random post but the right environment goes straight to the heart of feeling good in your job and what you do generally as well as how communities and networks enable co-operation and collaboration. This picks up on the principles which I referred to in my previous post.

Work won’t go away

One thing I know to be true about the future of my job – assuming for a moment that I do indeed stay in employment with my current employer – is that the pressures on the physical work place will be greater and greater as the council reduces the number of offices it has and moves toward a totally flexible and mobile workforce.

In principle I don’t disagree with this direction, in fact if I were a decision maker I’d be suggesting and making the same kind of recommendation – it just makes sense.

However as you’ll often hear people say – the devil is in the detail – I’ve been considering how the detail might look in my own team and the wider team of communications and have also considered things from a number of other perspectives.

One of the challenges that we need to get our head around is “it’s not where you work but how you work” that matters. This might seem really obvious to say but we also need to ensure that the environments we are creating actually facilitate and enable this shift in thinking.  If the environments stay the same but the pressure on space increases  then we simply stay in a mindset that says “I need my own desk, my own space and my hours of work are between x and y”.

When you consider how the majority of current workplaces are set up – they actually foster and reinforce a level of control over the workforce. Essentially we are saying “in order for me to feel comfortable and safe as a manager I need to see my staff at a desk between these hours in order for my to justify that they are indeed working”. This feels all wrong to me, but I can and have to appreciate that there are challenges in adopting a more flexible approach in every job role without really thinking how the job needs to be done…again  “it’s not where you work but how you work” that matters. But often enough any change isn’t supported by a change in how people work…instead people are expected to work flexibly and mobile whilst essentially having the same restrictions on their role as before. These may include things like access to file stores in a network, access to applications from anywhere etc.

I’m not for a second saying that this is the situation where I work, however there are some challenges and some real fundamental questions that need to be asked about what type of organisation we want to be and how we create a working environment that fosters a culture and workforce who are capable of delivering, supporting and commissioning services in the future.

I recently came across a new ways of working week which is promoted in Holland and I wondered whether we need to consider something like that here in order to really test out whether some people can in fact work differently and what we need to do in order to change the working environment to really support those people to work in new ways. Maybe that involves piloting a new piece of technology, working from a different location (home, cafe or another office), adopting a new process or whatever it might be…but for me it feels like that unless we actually try new ways of working we will in fact carry on working as we are but faced with less space, more work and fewer colleagues to work with.

The problem for me is that it is ok to have a broad direction of travel but with the pace of change being so fast we can’t or don’t have time to create strategies. We need to allow strategies to emerge based on how people wish to work and to create and support those environments.

If you look at your organisations policies, I mean really look at them you’ll find that essentially they are there to protect the status quo and not to push forward new ways of working (internal or external) whether digital or otherwise.

But I suspect in a local and central government context many councils are reducing the number of properties they own and operate from as this is an easy way to reduce costs without affecting front line services (unless those buildings are front line of course).

It’s a balancing act

I have a family (Wife, 2 kids and a dog), I enjoy activities such as cycling and karate as well as spending time with my family and seeing my kids grow up. It is important to me to be visible in their lives and that means being present at Xmas nativity plays, taking them into school each morning and helping them with their homework. Having a family is a full-time job – yet I also have a paid full-time job for the council where I want to do the best job I can within the scope and remit I have been given to work within. I also have a couple of voluntary positions (school governor, Exeter Schools consortium mgt board member and NED of Cosmic – it’s all in my about me page) as I want to be able to contribute and give back to my community in various ways as well as gain personal learning and development.

Now the challenge with all of the above is fitting it all in – it is however possible albeit not actually straight forward – AND this is a key issue, it could be a whole lot easier for me and those I try to work with and for, if some basic little things were made simpler and more integrated.  The reality is I’ve created a set of unsustainable and inefficient processes in order for me to simply manage all aspects of my life – something will and has to give in the near future!

One example  – which would make something easier for me would be having a “single unified calendar” where I could manage all my activities without having to duplicate or copy stuff from one to another.  Currently I operate from two main calendars. A work calendar which has my work life in it and the odd appointment (dentist, doctor etc) so I don’t forget it as well as booking the time out otherwise it gets filled up.  I actually used to put everything into my work calendar and tried to categorise it makes things private etc which weren’t work related. That was quite easy to do up until I started the additional roles i now perform…

I also have a calendar for everything else, but this calendar isn’t easy to manage due to the complexity and often conflicting times I need to book things in for. Before i can really accept or book anything into that I need to check my work calendar to ensure that i am in fact free or available on a given day regardless of the time as some work commitments take me away therefore they move into evenings etc so there isn’t a clear break point in any given day as to when work starts or stops.

Now being able to have a single calendar might not seem that much but it would mean that I would actually know where I was supposed to be and help me manage any “spare time” that occurs. But in order to actually achieve this kind of environment would mean that I need to have a level of access to my work calendar which is not currently there due to security and access restrictions. These maintain a position of work being very different to everything else I do. When for me it is part of everything I do and just like my real life it is and has to be integrated for it to work.

The right environment

In order for organisations to adapt and change they need to be able to provide the right environment for people to excel, to manage their complex lives and to be able to feel that there is in fact a work life balance.

I don’t know what the right environment is for you…but for me it needs to allow me to be a husband, father, friend, boss, colleague, community member, volunteer and allow me to manage all aspects of my life. Nothing much to ask for is it? :)

How about some principles…

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I’ve been wondering for a while now what actually needs to start happening or what would need to happen in order for communities and local government to start addressing the predicted financial meltdown.

I guess I’ve been looking for a checklist or some kind of “how to guide” that I could look at to help me and others I speak to outside of work better understand how we can start to move forward.  As a parent governor at my local school I’ve been intrigued by the early years foundation stage principles (PDF warning) and how the approach taken there is a lesson which can and should be reused and adapted to help guide us moving forward – perhaps this is too simplistic, but for me it has helped.

So I’ve decided to do just that and create a set of principles which could be applied to organisations or even communities themselves – I’d very much welcome comments as I’m sure I’ve missed things.

People and communities are unique

  • Design “with” not “for” people and communities
  • Design for Inclusion and accessibility
  • Enable independence
  • Foster health and wellbeing

Positive relationships and networks

  • Respect diversity of opinions
  • Connect people and connect networks
  • Co-operate and collaborate
  • Open by default

Enabling communities and environments

  • Evidence based research and decision-making
  • Support everyone to achieve
  • Think Local and Global
  • Digital infrastructure for smart communities/cities

Learning and development

  • Learn, discover and explore though experience
  • Create space for reflective practice
  • Foster creative and divergent thinking
  • Enable sustained learning